Computational modeling for what-is, what-might-be,and what-should-be studies—and triangulation

R. M. Burton and B. Obel, “Computational modeling for what-is, what-might-be,and what-should-be studies—and triangulation,” Organization science, vol. 22, iss. 5, p. 1195–1202, 2011.

Abstract

In this essay, we examine what-is, what-might-be, and what-should-be computational models where the purpose is to explore new concepts, ideas, boundaries, and limitations going beyond what we know at the moment. Computational models complement well with other approaches: ethnographies, field studies, human subject lab studies, and surveys in novel triangulations. Triangulation of two or more complementary approaches permits us to broaden and deepen our understanding and insights.

BibTeX

@article {2c094a00f26111df8ec7000ea68e967b,
number = {5},
publisher = {Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (I N F O R M S)},
issn = {1047-7039},
journal = {Organization Science},
pages = {1195--1202},
volume = {22},
doi = {10.1287/orsc.1100.0635},
year = {2011},
abstract = {In this essay, we examine what-is, what-might-be, and what-should-be computational models where the purpose is to explore new concepts, ideas, boundaries, and limitations going beyond what we know at the moment. Computational models complement well with other approaches: ethnographies, field studies, human subject lab studies, and surveys in novel triangulations. Triangulation of two or more complementary approaches permits us to broaden and deepen our understanding and insights.},
title = {Computational Modeling for What-Is, What-Might-Be,and What-Should-Be Studies—And Triangulation},
biburl = {https://zeal.global/publications/},
urltitle = {computational-modeling-for-what-is-what-might-be-and-what-should-be-studies-and-triangulation},
author = {Burton, Richard M and Obel, Børge}
}